Almsbury Farmhouse

Sudeley Castle, Winchcombe

14 Guests

7 Beds

4.5 Baths

Unpretentious and very welcoming, there is a great sense of style about this recently refurbished 18th century farmhouse. Situated on the edge of the Sudeley Estate, the farmhouse is within walking distance of the village known as the "The Jewel of the Cotswolds", Winchcombe. There are walks and cycle routes on your doorstep and eateries from Michelin standard to local pubs and cafes.
Read full Description

Facilities

  • WiFi
  • Dogs
  • Open Fire / Wood Burner
  • Pub within 1 mile
  • Shop within 1 mile
  • Parking - Parking for 6-7 cars
  • Travel Cot - x2
  • High Chair - x2
  • Bedding & towels
  • Free Entry to Sudeley Castle (Mar - Oct)

Reviews

This a beautiful farmhouse in an incredible location. Unfortunately Sudeley Castle was shut but we loved walking around winchcombe and surrounding areas. Would love to stay again.
Bruce January 13, 2018
This was the perfect place for our large family to gather; charming bedrooms, good showers, large family kitchen incredibly well equipped, cosy reception rooms and all on the doorstep of delightful Winchcombe with its beautiful...
Dana January 3, 2018
This farmhouse is absolutely stunning and amazing value. The hosts have clearly thought about every detail and added lots of thoughtful touches - the interior design of the building is stylish, interesting, and very family...
Taj December 24, 2017
Almsbury famhouse is a spacious and very well equipped and maintained house It is within walking distance of both the delightful town of Winchcombe and Sudeley castle. We had plenty of space for 9 adults...
Liz September 29, 2017
An absolutely wonderful property, steeped in character. I would not hesitate to recommend this property to anyone. Everything was perfect!
Jack October 8, 2017

Full Description

Lady Ashcombe has taken a special interest in the design and furnishing of the farmhouse. She recognises that our guests require the most up to date facilities, equipment and comfort, but has also personally selected works of art, objects and furniture that reflect the history and unique character of the building. Some of the contents come directly from the Castle’s collection, others from local antique shops and auction rooms.
Lady Ashcombe loves scouring the country for castle style antiques and objects and she is delighted to share these pieces with guests.
Amenities Summary
1 Superking; 2 Kings with ensuite; 2 twins; 1 twin (accessed through another bedroom); 1 King double in annex with own bathroom, lots of walk-in power-showers!
2 high chairs and 2 travel cots. 2 dishwashers, washer/dryer machine. 3 TVs, 3 wood burners and central heating.
Parking
From Winchcombe, turn onto Vineyard Street, go over bridge and the farmhouse is the first turning on your left. There is parking for approximately 8 cars. The wood store is located in the car park to the right of the annex. The Annex is to the left of the wood store.
Annex
Living room for two, bean bag, kitchen, toaster, gas oven, clothes airer, wooden beams, arched doors opening onto the courtyard.
From the living room turn left up the winding stairs that lead to a bright twin room with bean bag, dressing table, en-suite bathroom with walk in power shower heated towel rail and storage.

Main House
Ground Floor
Entrance to the Cotswold Stone farmhouse; front garden to the left with apple trees and lavender.
The Entrance Hall is stone-floored with a dresser; turn left into the Adult Sitting Room; turn right into Dining Room. Straight on upstairs with a banister is a landing, airing cupboard, book shelves and seating for reading looking with views of the courtyard.
Adult Sitting Room
2 large sofas to seat 8 people, 2 chairs, decorative fireplace, 65” TV and DVD player, bookshelves with informative and fictional reading, large stool and a cushioned window for reading with views of the front lawn.
Dining Room
Seating for 12 and 2 extra chairs. Stone-floored, wood burner, novelty ice buckets, bay window looking onto the courtyard, the other windows look to the back garden.
Breakfast Room
Cosy room with wood burner, dining table for 6, sofa and chairs for 4, 40” TV, wooden beams, book shelf.
Kitchen
Large, extendable island in the centre, Leisure Oven, LG free standing fridge and separate built-in fridge, DeLonghi 4-slice toaster, Russell Hobbs microwave, BOSCH dishwasher, DeLonghi filter coffee maker and DeLonghi kettle, Hanson scales, M&S crockery.
Boot/Utility Room
BOSCH washing/dryer machine, BOSCH dishwasher, deep ceramic sink, ironing board, lavatory with heated towel rail. Outside glasses and plates in the cupboards above the sink.
Snug
Wood burner, sofa, two bean bags, 40” TV and children’s table.
Out Building
Boiler cupboard, fuse box, two high chairs. Leads into back garden.
Back Garden
Garden table for 12 people on raised decking, retractable parasol, BBQ suitable for 12 guests. The picturesque Winchcombe Church is in the background. Tiered garden lawn, framed by Cotswold Stone outbuildings and wooden fences. There are Alpacas in a separate field to the rear – they are wild; don’t mistake them for horses and we do not recommend approaching them!
Front Garden
Sloping lawn with the Isbourne River at the bottom and the gentle sound of running water. The Church and Winchcombe village are in the distance and Vineyard Street is to the left.
First Floor
Bedroom 6 (en-suite)
King-size bedroom with en-suite bathroom and with walk-in large power shower and heated towel rail. Decorative fireplace, large built-in wardrobe, chest of drawers and looks out onto front garden.
Family Bathroom
Large walk-in power shower, free standing roll-top bath and heated towel rail.
Bedroom 4
Super King-size bedroom, decorative fireplace, two large built-in wardrobes, dressing table and looks out onto the front garden.
Bedroom 5 (en-suite)
Super King-size bedroom, two large built-in wardrobes, safe, chest of drawers and a rocking-chair. En-suite has a bath and shower over bath, double sinks and decorative fireplace.
Second Floor
Bedroom 1 (en-suite)
Annex twin bedroom with en-suite bedroom and a dressing room. The en-suite has a bath, hand-held shower and heated towel rail.
Bedroom 2
Twin Bedroom (right of stairs)
Twin beds and desk with entrance to Bedroom 3.
Bedroom 3
Another twin bedroom and games room accessed via Bedroom 2; perfect set up for children or people that know each other well. Two beanbags, table and shelves.

Things to Do

The historic market town of Winchcombe is quite literally on your doorstep here, providing a host of amenities, must-sees and activities to suit guests of all ages, shapes and sizes:

Eating
With Winchcombe on your doorstep and the Cotswolds’ many market towns and villages just a short car ride away, you’re somewhat spoiled for choice when it comes to places to head to feed your appetite. For gourmet-hunters, Winchcombe’s 5 North Street is just a 5-minute stroll from the cottage, offering Michelin-starred seasonal dishes created by expert husband and wife team Gus and Kate. Michelin-recommended Wesley House is also just a 5-minute walk in Winchcombe’s town centre, offering exceptional cooking in the confines of a characterful 15th century house. For fans of more relaxed cuisine, The White Hart Inn on Winchcombe’s High Street offers tasty gastropub grub in relaxed, rustic-chic surroundings, as well as The Corner Cupboard Inn; a historic 15th Century Inn serving traditional fare, supposedly haunted by a 12-year-old girl! Just 10 minutes’ down the road by car, The Pheasant Inn at Toddington is a great choice for families or groups visiting the GWSR Steam Railway station next door, whilst The Royal Oak at Gretton offers an unbeatable pub garden; perfect for sunny afternoons when only a pub pint will do.

Walking
Winchcombe’s rolling countryside is a true walkers’ paradise, with options for casual, seasoned and hardy walkers running right from the cottage’s front door. Winchcombe itself is a “walkers are welcome” town, a special status awarded to towns and villages which go above and beyond with their walking amenities, making it a fantastic destination for groups in search of a walking break. The Winchcombe Way, a 42-mile figure-of-eight trail centred around the town, offers walkers a great way of discovering the surrounding Cotswold towns and villages section-by-section over the course of a stay, whilst there are plenty of options for those looking for a more casual, leisurely pace within a close radius of the cottage. We recommend the Sudeley Castle Circular walk for a relaxing stroll; a 2-mile loop setting off straight from the cottage’s front door, taking you into the grounds of historic Sudeley Castle – a must-visit for any guest. The 2 ½ mile walk to Belas Knap, a Neolithic chambered long barrow sat atop Cleeve Hill, is also a great walk to try from the doorstep, providing you don’t mind the incline.

Must-Sees
Sudeley Castle, historic home and resting place of Henry VIII’s last wife Katherine Parr, is situated just a short stroll from the cottage and is an absolute must-visit for guests. Offering plenty to keep all ages entertained, the beautiful grounds will satisfy garden-lovers and history buffs alike, whilst the adventure playground and acres of manicured lawns offer the perfect place for younger guests to stretch their legs. Cheltenham Racecourse, home of the world-famous Cheltenham Festival, is just a 15-minute drive and the perfect day out destination for racing fans, whilst Toddington’s GWSR Steam Railway (7-minute drive) offers a fantastic day on the rails for vintage locomotive enthusiasts. Further afield, history buffs have Blenheim Palace (1-hour drive) and Warwick Castle (1-hour drive) to explore, whilst Shakespeare’s birthplace, the medieval market town of Stratford-upon-Avon, is just 40 minutes by car. Families will love Cotswold Farm Park (15-minute drive) and the pretty Cotswold village of Broadway, just 7 miles away, with its independent boutiques, art galleries, cafés and fantastic adventure park.

Guidebook

The historic market town of Winchcombe is quite literally on your doorstep here, providing a host of amenities, must-sees and activities to suit guests of all ages, shapes and sizes:

Eating
With Winchcombe on your doorstep and the Cotswolds’ many market towns and villages just a short car ride away, you’re somewhat spoiled for choice when it comes to places to head to feed your appetite. For gourmet-hunters, Winchcombe’s 5 North Street is just a 5-minute stroll from the cottage, offering Michelin-starred seasonal dishes created by expert husband and wife team Gus and Kate. Michelin-recommended Wesley House is also just a 5-minute walk in Winchcombe’s town centre, offering exceptional cooking in the confines of a characterful 15th century house. For fans of more relaxed cuisine, The White Hart Inn on Winchcombe’s High Street offers tasty gastropub grub in relaxed, rustic-chic surroundings, as well as The Corner Cupboard Inn; a historic 15th Century Inn serving traditional fare, supposedly haunted by a 12-year-old girl! Just 10 minutes’ down the road by car, The Pheasant Inn at Toddington is a great choice for families or groups visiting the GWSR Steam Railway station next door, whilst The Royal Oak at Gretton offers an unbeatable pub garden; perfect for sunny afternoons when only a pub pint will do.

Walking
Winchcombe’s rolling countryside is a true walkers’ paradise, with options for casual, seasoned and hardy walkers running right from the cottage’s front door. Winchcombe itself is a “walkers are welcome” town, a special status awarded to towns and villages which go above and beyond with their walking amenities, making it a fantastic destination for groups in search of a walking break. The Winchcombe Way, a 42-mile figure-of-eight trail centred around the town, offers walkers a great way of discovering the surrounding Cotswold towns and villages section-by-section over the course of a stay, whilst there are plenty of options for those looking for a more casual, leisurely pace within a close radius of the cottage. We recommend the Sudeley Castle Circular walk for a relaxing stroll; a 2-mile loop setting off straight from the cottage’s front door, taking you into the grounds of historic Sudeley Castle – a must-visit for any guest. The 2 ½ mile walk to Belas Knap, a Neolithic chambered long barrow sat atop Cleeve Hill, is also a great walk to try from the doorstep, providing you don’t mind the incline.

Must-Sees
Sudeley Castle, historic home and resting place of Henry VIII’s last wife Katherine Parr, is situated just a short stroll from the cottage and is an absolute must-visit for guests. Offering plenty to keep all ages entertained, the beautiful grounds will satisfy garden-lovers and history buffs alike, whilst the adventure playground and acres of manicured lawns offer the perfect place for younger guests to stretch their legs. Cheltenham Racecourse, home of the world-famous Cheltenham Festival, is just a 15-minute drive and the perfect day out destination for racing fans, whilst Toddington’s GWSR Steam Railway (7-minute drive) offers a fantastic day on the rails for vintage locomotive enthusiasts. Further afield, history buffs have Blenheim Palace (1-hour drive) and Warwick Castle (1-hour drive) to explore, whilst Shakespeare’s birthplace, the medieval market town of Stratford-upon-Avon, is just 40 minutes by car. Families will love Cotswold Farm Park (15-minute drive) and the pretty Cotswold village of Broadway, just 7 miles away, with its independent boutiques, art galleries, cafés and fantastic adventure park.

Local Pubs & Restaurants

Wesley House Restaurant & Wine Bar, High Street
01242 602 366

Number 5, North Street
01242 604 566

The Old Corner Cupboard, 83 Gloucester Street
01242 602 303

The Lion Inn, 37 North Street
01242 603 300

Plaisterers Arms, Abbey Terrace
01242 602 358

Jury’s Teashop, High Street
01242 602 469

The White Hart, High Street
01242 602 359

The Royal Oak, Working Lane, Gretton
01242 602 477

The Old Tea House, 6 Hailes Street
01242 604 363

Food Fanatics Deli and Coffee Shop, 12 North Street
01242 604 466

Takeaways

Winchcombe Fish Bar, North Street
01242 603 080

Winchcombe Chinese, 17 North Street
01242 602 116

Convenience Stores

The Midcounties Co-operative, 22-24 North Street Open 7am-10pm

Warner’s Budgens, Greet Rd Open 7am-9pm

Walks
Winchcombe Way
This super figure of eight trail takes you on a tour of the stunning northern area of the Cotswolds.

The walk begins at the lovely town of Winchcombe and heads to Dumbleton via Gretton and Alderton. At Dumbleton you turn south over Dumbleton Hill and through Alstone toward Cleeve Hill and Common. Cleeve Hill is the highest point both of the Cotswolds hill range and in the county of Gloucestershire, at 1083 ft. Here you will also find Belas Knap neolithic chambered long barrow. A scheduled ancient monument in the care of English Heritage, it has been described as an ‘outstanding example representing a group of long barrows commonly referred to as the Cotswold-Severn group’.

Shortly after Belas Knap you return to Winchcombe where the next section of the walk takes to Temple Guiting, passing through Guiting Wood on the way. The path continues to Snowshill where you can explore the delightful Snowshill Manor. Here you can view Charles Wade’s collection of ‘colour, craftsmanship and design’ and enjoy the beautiful hillside gardens.

From Stanshill you continue through Buckland and Stanton before coming to another major route highlight at Stanway House. This splendid Jacobean  manor house is right on the trail and open to the public. There are also beautiful gardens and a 300ft high fountain which is the tallest gravity fountain in the world.

The final section of the walk takes you back to Winchcombe, passing Didbrook and the National Trust owned Hailes Abbey with its 13th century ruins and excellent museum.

Eastern Loop
The eastern loop climbs out of Winchcombe and follows the Farmcote valley before entering Guiting Wood. From here it passes through quiet valleys and the tranquil villages of Cutsdean, Taddington and Snowshill. The route turns and follows the Cotswold escarpment through the villages of Buckland, Laverton and Stanton nestling at the bottom of the hill. The trail passes Stanway House and the recently restored watermill before passing Hailes Abbey on the return to Winchcombe.

Western Loop
The western loop ascends Langley Hill with splendid views before dropping down into Gretton and across to Alderton. From here the trail skirts around Dumbleton Hill with ever changing views before heading to Alstone. From Alstone the views ahead of wooded hills inspires one to climb Nottingham Hill and onto Cleeve Common. The vast common has rare plants and spectacular views before you head to Belas Knap long barrow and descend towards Winchcombe with fine views of Sudeley Castle and the surrounding countryside.

Obtain copies of a more detailed route map from Winchcombe Tourist Information.

The Isbourne Way

This waymarked trail, launched at Winchcombe’s walking festival in 2014, follows the River Isbourne from its source on Cleeve Hill to its confluence with the Warwickshire Avon at Evesham, a distance of some 14 miles.

The Isbourne Way weaves existing footpaths into a route starting at the Washpool on Cleeve Hill, it passes through Winchcombe, Toddington, Wormington and Sedgeberrow, and ends at Evesham. The

trail features woods, open countryside, villages and towns with pubs and shops, and sites of interest such as mills and churches.

The Isbourne Way itself is waymarked throughout using the mill wheel motif shown. The prologue, the epilogue and the ‘return’ routes are not identified on the ground, but are signed with the standard arrows – yellow for footpaths, blue for bridleways.

Please visit the Winchcombe Tourist Information Centre for a guide.

Cycling
The Cotswolds is perfect for cyclists, there are bridleways and quiet country lanes galore and while you’ll struggle to avoid a few uphill stretches at least most are relatively short and gentle and, as well as the freewheel downhill afterwards, your efforts will have earnt you a guilt free drink and meal in one of the hostelries so thoughtfully scattered along your route!

There are a number of companies offering guided or self-guided cycling tours and holidays – there’s even one with electric bikes! If you prefer to do your own thing there are a number of downloadable cycle rides or just buy a map and plan your own route.

You can find routes to download at the following here, alternatively, enquire at any Cotswold Tourist Information Centre.

History of Sudeley

Saxon to Tudor Period

 

Sudeley Castle gets its name from the Saxon word ‘Sud’, meaning South Place or South Field and in Saxon times its neighbouring town of Winchcombe was a royal stronghold for the kingdom of Mercia.  Kenulf, who was King of Mercia from 796 to 821 had a royal palace in the town and founded Winchcombe Abbey in 798, a Benedictine Monastery which became a centre of pilgrimage until its dissolution in 1539.  Even before the Saxon era the Roman Legions had settled in the ‘fat valley’ of Winchombe and remains of their villas have been found on the Sudeley Estate.

 

Sudeley Castle’s own history begins in the 10th Century when it was owned by King Ethelred II (the unready) who gave the manor of Sudeley as a wedding present to his daughter Goda on her marriage to Walter de Maunt.  Traces of this original manor house have been found in the Hop Yard Field to the North East of the present Castle, but no record survives of life at Sudeley during this period, although we know that the Estate was highly prized – its oak trees were charted in the Domesday Book – and it also included a royal deer park.

 

Rather unusually the property was not confiscated after the Norman Conquest as Goda was distantly related to the Duke of Normandy.  During the reign of King Stephen, the property passed to John de Sudeley who took up arms for Matilda against the King in 1139.  The King seized Sudeley and garrisoned it and it is likely that the first destruction of the Castle took place at this time.

 

The Castle was restored to the Sudeley family who flourished there for the next two centuries, distinguishing themselves in the Crusades and other campaigns and John, 9th Lord de Sudeley rose to become Lord Chamberlain to King Edward II before dying in 1367 when fighting with the Black Prince of Spain.  John left no children and Sudeley then passed through marriage to the Boteler Family.

 

Ralf Boteler became one of the Castle’s most illustrious owners.  A renowned Admiral of the Fleet, he fought in the French Wars under Henry V and Henry VI and was created Baron Sudeley in 1441.  He became Sudeley’s first great builder, using the spoils of war to rebuild the Castle as a magnificent residence.  His principle contribution to the building that still stands today were the Portmere Tower, to the west side, named after a French Admiral he captured, the Gatehouse, the Dungeon Tower (where the Castle offices are located), and the Banqueting Hall and Tithe Barn, both now romantic ruins. The wealth he gained from the French Wars also enabled him to build St Mary’s Chapel to the east, with a covered gallery leading from the Castle to the Family pew on the south side of the chancel.

 

Unfortunately, his prosperity did not last.  He backed the wrong side in the Wars of the Roses and with the accession of Edward IV of the House of York, Boteler who had backed the House of Lancaster, was branded a traitor.  He was saved from execution but was forced to sell Sudeley Castle and the Estate to King Edward and Sudeley once again became a royal property.

 

For the next nine years the Castle was owned, but essentially used by Edward IV’s brother, Richard, Duke of Gloucester, later King Richard III.  Henry VII defeated Richard at the Battle of Bosworth and became the first Tudor King, giving the use of the Sudeley Estate to his Uncle, The Earl of Pembroke and Duke of Bedford.  After Bedford’s death in 1495, neither Henry VII not Henry VIII seemed to have much interest in the Estate and although Henry VIII is said to have inspected the property with Anne Boleyn in 1535 the Castle fell into disrepair.

 

When Henry VIII died the young Edward VI gave Sudeley to his Uncle, Sir Thomas Seymour, appointing him Lord High Admiral and Baron Sudeley.  Seymour was a member of one of the most influential families in England at the time.  His sister Jane Seymour, had been Henry VIII’s wife and his brother, Edward Seymour, was Duke of Somerset and Lord Protector to the boy king.  After Henry VIII Sir Thomas Seymour married the widowed Queen Katherine Parr, Henry’s sixth and last wife.

 

Thomas Seymour and Katherine Parr married within weeks of Henry’s death and he began to prepare Sudeley as their residence.  A nursery was made ready for the child Katherine was expecting, and these rooms still survive in the south-east corridor of the Castle within the 12th century tower.

 

Katherine Parr brought a vast household to Sudeley, and also the young Lady Jane Grey.  Miles Coverdale, the translator of the Bible, stayed at the Castle for a while and Katherine settled down to enjoy the peace and tranquillity of the Gloucestershire countryside and await the birth of her child.  On 30th August 1548 Katherine gave birth to a daughter, Mary only to die seven days later of puerperal fever and the funeral was conducted by Miles Coverdale.

 

Thomas Seymor did not stay at Sudeley for the funeral but returned directly to London where he was attempting to anew his courtship with Princess Elizabeth and later seeking to ingratiate himself with the young Edward VI by turning him against the Protector, Edward his own brother.  He was charged with treason, imprisoned in the Tower and beheaded on the 20th March 1549.

 

The Castle was then given to Katherine Parr’s brother, but he was also disgraced after being involved in the plot to place Lady Jane Grey on the throne for nine days, by which time Mary I had become Queen.  In 1544 Queen Mary granted Sudeley Castle to Sir John Brydes one of her loyal supporters, and created him Baron.

 

The Stuarts

 

When relations between Charles I and parliament finally broke down in 1642 Civil war became inevitable.  In August of that year Charles raised his standard at Nottingham and rallied his supporters.  At Sudeley Castle, George 6th Lord Chandos declared firmly for the King, armed his tenants and servants and placed the Castle under the command of his brother.  Then the 22-year-old marched to join Charles at Shrewsbury with 100 men and £500 worth of gold plate.

 

This was the start of the central role which Sudeley Castle played in the Civil war.  Charles I made his headquarters at Oxford and Sudeley was garrisoned for the King and soon became the base for Charles’ nephew, Prince Rupert of the Rhine.  In January 1643, the Castle surrendered to the Roundheads during Chandos’ absence, being plundered and desecrated.  The Roundheads left Sudeley, which was once again garrisoned for the King only to be besieged a second time in June 1644 and surrendered after a long and heavy fight.  The Castle was left permanently scarred in the attack and the Octagon Tower still displays the large hole where it was hit by cannon fire.

 

At the end of the Civil war, Chandos was heavily fined, but retained the Castle by renouncing his support for the King and defecting to the Parliamentary party.  However, this was not enough to save Sudeley.  In April 1649, the Council of State ordered that the Castle be ‘slighted’ or rendered untenable as a military post.  The roof was removed exposing the entire building to the elements.   The greater part of the south quadrangle, the magnificent Banqueting Hall, of which only some of the fine windows and fireplaces remain, looks now much as it did in 1649.  Lord Chandos ended his life in obscurity and dishonour, the title and Estates passing to his brother, then to a distant cousin and finally to the Pitt family of Stratfield Saye.

 

Sudeley Castle itself lay neglected for two centuries, although the discovery of Katherine Parr’s tomb in the Chapel began to attract sightseers.  King George III was among them and on a visit in 1788 fell down one of the old staircases.  With the prospect of the ruins becoming a visitor attraction the Marquis of Buckingham bought the Castle in 1810.

 

The Victorian Era

 

Sudeley Castle itself lay neglected for two centuries, although the discovery of Katherine Parr’s tomb in the Chapel began to attract sightseers.  King George III was among them and on a visit in 1788 fell down one of the old staircases.  With the prospect of the ruins becoming a visitor attraction the Marquis of Buckingham bought the Castle in 1810 and used it as a public house and later it became a farm.

 

The Castle and Estate were finally rescued by William and John Dent, wealthy glove makers from Worcester, who in 1830 bought the Estate from Lord Rivers.  The Dent brothers were keen amateur historians and used their considerable wealth to start an extensive and ambitious programme of restoration, and the Castle soon became a family home with the added attraction of many of the Tudor paintings and artefacts bought at the Strawberry Hill sale in 1842.

 

When both brothers died within a year of each other in 1854/55 Sudeley Castle was left to their nephew John Coucher Dent who with his wife Emma Brocklehurst, from one of the Macclesfield silk families, continued the restoration work and so it is to Emma Dent that we owe the splendour of Sudeley as it stands today.  For almost half a century she dedicated her life to the Castle, building the Jubilee buildings of the West Wing, the North Tower, the two gate lodges and the present entrance to the Estate, as well as laying out the gardens, including planting the magnificent yew hedges.

 

She was also an enthusiastic collector of documents, paper and objects relating to the history of the Castle and the Family, as well as autographs from leading personalities of the time.

 

Emma Dent was also a tireless and generous benefactor to the local community, bringing piped water to Winchcombe, building a church and school at Gretton and with her husband the Almshouses and Dents School in Winchcombe.

 

Emma and John Dent had no children and on her death in 1900, he had predeceased her in 1885, the Castle was inherited by one of Emma’s nephews, Henry Dent-Brocklehurst, and has remained the Family home of the Dent-Brocklehurst’s for the entire 20th Century and continues into the 21st Century.

Dog Code of Conduct

BRINGING YOUR DOG TO OUR COTTAGES

At Bolthole Retreats we are proud to provide quality, luxury accommodation in our beautiful holiday cottages. We enjoy meeting the different needs of all our guests by offering a selection of both dog-free and dog-friendly holiday cottages. For this to work for everyone, we have a Dog Code of Conduct, which can be found below.

Our dog friendly cottages can be found on our Dog Friendly Cottages page. We are able to accommodate a maximum of two well-behaved dogs in each of our dog-friendly properties. Guests must let us know they are bringing their dog at the time of booking. We take a small charge of £25 per pet.

When booking, guests are required to accept our Terms & Conditions, including the Dogs Code of Conduct. This enables us to ensure we keep our cottages in excellent condition for all guests.

Dogs Code of Conduct:

  • We ask that your dog be kept on the lead in the courtyard.
  • The surrounding fields are often used for grazing sheep and lambs. Dogs must be kept on a lead when walking through the fields if they are occupied by livestock.
  • We ask that you do not allow your dog on furniture or in bedrooms. An additional cleaning fee will be incurred should there be evidence of dogs having been on beds or furniture.
  • If you are part of a group booking, your dog must be kept to the dog-friendly cottage it was booked into. If you wish your dog to go in and out of other cottages included in your booking, the £25 pet fee must be paid for those cottages too. This of course will mean ensuring the other cottages in your booking are also dog-friendly.
  • Dogs must be booked and paid for in advance. Any dogs arriving without prior arrangement will need to be accommodated elsewhere at your own cost.
  • Dogs are not allowed to be left unattended in any cottage unless they are happy to rest in their own cage brought from home and are unlikely to bark and disturb other guests. A list of walks, as well as dog-friendly pubs, is provided to help you plan a dog-friendly day out.
  • We regret that dogs known to bark excessively are not permitted.
  • Please wash off muddy dogs before entering the cottage; guest towels must not be used on dogs.
  • Please clean up after your dog, including whilst in the cottage gardens, courtyards and the surrounding fields. Dog waste must be binned using appropriate bags.
  • Any damage caused by dogs to furniture, carpets, bed linen etc. will incur a commensurate replacement or cleaning fee.
  • Please obey the Countryside Code whilst enjoying the area with your dog. Keep your dog under close control at all times for their own safety as well as the comfort of others.
  • Upon departure, please leave the cottage as you would wish to find it. An additional cleaning fee will be incurred should excessive cleaning be required following your departure.

Almsbury Farmhouse

Sudeley Castle, Winchcombe

14 Guests

7 Beds

4.5 Baths

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